Merging Opposing Viewpoints: Analysis of the Development of a Statewide Sustainable Local Food Advisory Council in a Traditional Agricultural State

  • Molly De Marco University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Leah Chapman University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Cordon McGee University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Larissa Calancie University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Lauren Burnham University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Alice Ammerman University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Keywords: State Food Policy Council, North Carolina, Policy, Food System

Abstract

Food policy councils (FPCs) are a useful way for interested groups to work together to create mutually beneficial change within the food system. Often formed through grassroots organizing or commissioned by governmental entities, FPCs have been successful at tackling challenges within food systems by creating forums to address issues whose roots ordinarily are in disparate parts of these systems. Little peer-reviewed research exists, however, examining the formation of state-level FPCs, particularly among states known for their conventional production practices. In this case study, we explored the process of forming a statewide FPC in North Carolina from 2007 to 2009. The objectives were to (a) qualitatively exam­ine the two-year process of forming a statewide FPC in a traditional agriculture state, and (b) iden­tify the factors that led to its formation. To do so, we developed an in-depth interview guide for inter­viewing eight individuals, including government stakeholders, conventional agricultural producers, sustainable agricultural producers, philanthropists, and legal representatives. We used qualitative analy­sis methods to analyze the transcripts, drawing on John Kingdon’s agenda-setting and policy-formation theory to guide analysis. Results indi­cated that four factors drove the formation of the North Carolina state-level FPC: (1) stakeholder involvement, (2) diverse partnerships, (3) stake­holder ability to compromise, and (4) a conducive political setting. While the small sample size pre­vents us from causally interpreting our results and generalizing our findings, this preliminary research may provide insight for other states, especially those with a predominately traditional agriculture system, that are interested in forming state-level FPCs.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Author Biographies

Molly De Marco, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 1700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7426; and

Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 135 Dauer Drive; 245 Rosenau Hall, CB #7461; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461

Leah Chapman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Center for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 1700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., CB# 7426; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7426; and

Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 135 Dauer Drive; 245 Rosenau Hall, CB #7461; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461

Cordon McGee, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Center for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 1700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., CB# 7426; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7426
Larissa Calancie, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Center for Health Equity Research, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 323 MacNider Hall, CB# 7240; 333 South Columbia Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7240
Lauren Burnham, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Center for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 1700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., CB# 7426; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7426
Alice Ammerman, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Center for Health Promotion & Disease Prevention, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 1700 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., CB# 7426; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7426; and

Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; 135 Dauer Drive; 245 Rosenau Hall, CB #7461; Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461

Published
2017-09-05
How to Cite
De Marco, M., Chapman, L., McGee, C., Calancie, L., Burnham, L., & Ammerman, A. (2017). Merging Opposing Viewpoints: Analysis of the Development of a Statewide Sustainable Local Food Advisory Council in a Traditional Agricultural State. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 7(3), 197-210. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2017.073.018