Freedom’s Seeds: Reflections of Food, Race, and Community Development: Voices of the Food Movement in Detroit

  • Monica M. White University of Wisconsin–Madison
Keywords: Detroit, Urban Agriculture, Community Gardens, Race

Abstract

First paragraph:

Tee is a mother of four, born and raised in Detroit. She became an urban gardener one day in 2009 when she decided to take her lawnmower to a nearby abandoned, vacant lot filled with chest-high weeds and turn it into a commu­nity garden. Once she had cleared the space, she went door to door inviting neighbors to meet up to co-create a beautiful space. Where once pedestrians had crossed the street to avoid walking by a lot that seemed sinister, during the growing season it is now inviting, filled with fresh fruits and vegetables such as kale, tomatoes, collards, onions, water­melon, and zucchini the community grows. They also grow flowers, including lavender. Music can be heard while neighbors work in the garden, and artists are hard at work painting signs, building compost bins, and creating other garden decora­tions that together make this a community space....

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Author Biography

Monica M. White, University of Wisconsin–Madison
Assistant professor of environmental justice, University of Wisconsin–Madison, with a joint appointment in the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies and the Department of Community and Environmental Sociology
Photo of Monica M. White
Published
2017-03-02
How to Cite
White, M. M. (2017). Freedom’s Seeds: Reflections of Food, Race, and Community Development: Voices of the Food Movement in Detroit. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 7(2), 5-7. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2017.072.009