Engaged Advocacy and Learning To Represent the Self: Positioning People of Color in Our Contemporary Food Movement

  • Regina A. Bernard-Carreño City University of New York
Keywords: Food Access, Self-Help, Food Sovereignty, People of Color, Culturally Appropriate Foods

Abstract

Issues with access to food access are not solely that people of color are not included in the happenings of the food movement; it is also problematic just how our inclusion happens. Our issues within the movement are as diverse as we are, and there is no one particular narrative that can illustrate these sets of dilemmas easily. The solutions are even more difficult to generate and institute. Within these many complexities, however, both in addressing the problem and in finding positive results, there is also the problem of the lack of involvement within the community in a critical dialogue. Without a dialogue about these diverse sets of problems, working together to solve them seems a distant possibility.

Author Biography

Regina A. Bernard-Carreño, City University of New York
Associate Professor, Black and Latino Studies, Baruch College, City University of New York; 55 Lexington Avenue, Suite 4274VC; New York, New York 10010 USA.
Published
2016-10-04
How to Cite
Bernard-Carreño, R. (2016). Engaged Advocacy and Learning To Represent the Self: Positioning People of Color in Our Contemporary Food Movement. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 5(4), 189-193. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2015.054.028