Can you have it your way? The consequences of racial capitalism in fast food in America

Authors

  • Tristian Lee University of Wisconsin-Madison

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2023.124.009

Keywords:

Fast Food, Race, Cultural History, Racial Capitalism, Food Studies, Urban Studies

Abstract

First paragraph:

White Burgers, Black Cash deftly traces the inter­twined history of fast food, race, and capital in America. The goal of this monograph is to chart the racial and spatial pathways fast food has tra­v­eled, from its genesis in the early twentieth cen­tury to the contemporary moment—where it has become heavily concentrated in Black communi­ties. From the onset, Naa Oyo A. Kwate sets the tone for the rest of the study, stating, “Fast food has always been a fundamentally anti-Black enter­prise” (p. xiii). The introduction shows how the anti-Blackness of fast food goes beyond health disparities, and instead is rooted in the subordina­tion of Blackness throughout history. The book sets out to outline the history of fast food’s color line, with an emphasis on three cities: New York, Chicago, and Washington D.C. . . .

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Author Biography

Tristian Lee, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Ph.D. student in community and environmental sociology

Cover of "White Burgers, Black Cash"

Published

2023-08-18

How to Cite

Lee, T. (2023). Can you have it your way? The consequences of racial capitalism in fast food in America. Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems, and Community Development, 12(4), 1–3. https://doi.org/10.5304/jafscd.2023.124.009